A TEXT POST

on sadness

"cold is like sadness,"
you said,
“nonexistent. the absence of a thing.”

no.
sadness is definitely a thing.
I can feel it
take root in my chest
and wrap its fingers
around my heart.
I can feel it
press on my lungs
and make it hard to draw breath.

sadness has mass.

A VIDEO

as-cool-as-an-attempted-suicide:

wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.

We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.

(Dead Poets Society, 1989)

Me
Reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR
A VIDEO

I knew before I was writing it, music was going to be the number one character. It was going to be the lead character – the music going on. I feel like as a teenager, that’s the most expressive element of your life. - Richard Linklater

A PHOTO

mortisia:

Clementine von Radics | Transparent

Reblogged from Clementine von Radics
A PHOTO

historicaltimes:

Goodbye Kiss, Pennsylvania Station, 1944. Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt.

Reblogged from Historical Times
A TEXT POST

lionheart191 asked: When you finish a story, whether it be a novel or a short story, how do you decide what stays in the story and what doesn't? I find it hard when I start the editing process, because there will be times in certain moods where I really like something, and in others where I just want to eradicate it from existence.

joehillsthrills:

I look askance at big blocks of prose. Those are places where attention wanders and the reader’s excitement begins to cool. I don’t care how good a sentence might be… we’ve got to keep moving. Hemingway said kill your darlings, but I try not to have darlings at all, and kill at will.

This is probably not terribly helpful. But I guess try and find one sentence in every paragraph that says the thing the reader needs to know to get to the next paragraph. Then see about deleting everything else. Maybe you can’t delete everything else. But you’d be shocked at how much can go.

There were a lot of sentences in Max Berry’s LEXICON that gave me an electric shock of pleasure. One was just: “A thin dog scratched in the dirt.” That was enough to show me a whole dusty, sandy, barren landscape of trailers, cars on cinder blocks, empty sidewalks, loneliness. One little sentence that carried a whole widescreen picture.

Try and find that thin dog, and skip everything else.

This is excellent advice for any writer.  I need to do this more often.

Reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR
A QUOTE

Don’t compare your Chapter 1 to someone else’s Chapter 20.

Reblogged from The Learning Brain
A PHOTO

historicaltimes:

"Audrey Hepburn shopping with her pet deer “Ip” in Beverly Hills, CA, 1958."

Reblogged from Historical Times
A TEXT POST

hi:

to everyone with finals and exams and big projects due very very soon and haven’t started anything yet

image

A PHOTO

Food for thought.

Reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR
A VIDEO
Reblogged from Been Drinking
A VIDEO

rosalindrobertson:

Canada. One of the best moments in our history.

(Fun fact, the guy enthusiastically stating for the record that we’ll never be a safe haven for zombies used to be my boss…)

Reblogged from The DIY Couturier
A VIDEO

thanks for the adventures

Reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR